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Chicago Style: Journal Articles

A guide to writing papers and citing sources in Chicago style.

Superscripts

Remember that your notes should be indicated by a superscript number. In order to insert a superscript, first type the number, then highlight it with your mouse. From here, you can either right-click and select the 'Font' option, then check the 'Superscript' box, or hold down Control and Shift and press the + key. For Macs, use the COMMAND key instead of Control. You can also use the 'Font' controls in your toolbar.

Rules for Journal Notes

Journal articles will make up much of your research at ABAC. Notes for journals will follow a similar format as notes for books. The only major difference between a note for a print journal and one for an online journal is the inclusion of a URL or DOI (digital object identifier) for the online journal.

  1. Author: Full name(s) of authors (Firstname Middlename Lastname).
  2. Article Title: and subtitle of article or column, with all major words capitalized(surrounded by quotation marks)
  3. Journal Title: all major words capitalized (in italicized characters) [no comma after title information].
  4. Volume/Issue: information (volume number, no. [issue number])
  5. Publication date: in parentheses and ended with a colon “(month, year):”.
  6. Page numbers: (where appropriate).
  7. Access date: (for online publications
  8. URL/ DOI: (for online publications).

The basic layout for a journal note follows:

[indented tab]1. Author Firstname Lastname, “Article Title:Subtitle,” Title of Journal volume #, no. [Issue number] (Publication Month, Year): page numbers, access date, URL/DOI.

Examples

Physical Journal

1. Hope A. Olson, “Codes, Costs, and Critiques: The Organization of Information in Library Quarterly, 1931-2004,” Library

Quarterly 76, no. 1 (2006): 20.

Online Journal

2. Judith Lewis, “’Tis a Misfortune to Be a Great Ladie’: Maternal Mortality in the British Aristocracy, 1558-1959,” Journal

of British Studies 37, no. 1 (1998): 26-53, http://www.jstor.org/stable/176034.

3. David Meban, “Temple Building, Primus Language, and the Proem to Virgil’s Third Georgic,” Classical Philology 103,

no. 2 (2008): 135, doi:10.10.86/590066.